Not Top

 

The Complete Singles Plus: The Sun Years 1958-1963

The Complete Singles Plus: The Sun Years 1958-1963
 

It's Your Turn

iTunes 10 New Releases

Comin Home - EP - Jessie James Decker
Comin Home - EP by Jessie James Decker

Lights Out - Ingrid Michaelson
Lights Out by Ingrid Michaelson

Hustler - Single - 50 Cent
Hustler - Single by 50 Cent

Talk Dirty - Jason Derulo
Talk Dirty by Jason Derulo

Talk Dirty - Jason Derulo
Talk Dirty by Jason Derulo

Testimony - August Alsina
Testimony by August Alsina

Glee: The Music, Tested - EP - Glee Cast
Glee: The Music, Tested - EP by Glee Cast

State of Mind - Dizzy Wright
State of Mind by Dizzy Wright

Hustler - Single - 50 Cent
Hustler - Single by 50 Cent

Testimony (Deluxe Version) - August Alsina
Testimony (Deluxe Version) by August Alsina

Charlie Rich

The Complete Singles Plus: The Sun Years 1958-1963

 
Cover The Complete Singles Plus: The Sun Years 1958-1963 click the image to get it in cd-cover size
Release Date:
Label: Varese Records
Rating: 5.0
 
»» Download The Complete Singles Plus: The Sun Years 1958-1963 for free
Description:
 
 

 
Tracklist of The Complete Singles Plus: The Sun Years 1958-1963

Disc 1
1 Whirlwind  2:06 no lyrics yet - submit it
2 Philadelphia Baby   no lyrics yet - submit it
3 Big Man   no lyrics yet - submit it
4 Rebound  1:52 no lyrics yet - submit it
5 Lonely Weekends  2:11 no lyrics yet - submit it
6 Everything I Do Is Wrong   no lyrics yet - submit it
7 Gonna Be Waiting   no lyrics yet - submit it
8 School Days   no lyrics yet - submit it
9 On My Knees  3:14 no lyrics yet - submit it
10 Stay  2:54 no lyrics yet - submit it
11 Who Will the Next Fool Be  2:44 no lyrics yet - submit it
12 Caught in the Middle   no lyrics yet - submit it
13 Just a Little Bit Sweet   no lyrics yet - submit it
14 It's Too Late   no lyrics yet - submit it
15 Midnite Blues   no lyrics yet - submit it
16 Easy Money   no lyrics yet - submit it
17 Sittin' and Thinkin'  3:05 no lyrics yet - submit it
18 Finally Found Out   no lyrics yet - submit it
19 There's Another Place I Can't Go  2:40 no lyrics yet - submit it
20 I Need Your Love   no lyrics yet - submit it
21 Break Up [*]   no lyrics yet - submit it
22 Goodbye Mary Ann [*]   no lyrics yet - submit it
23 Gentle as a Lamb [*]   no lyrics yet - submit it
24 Yes Ma'am [#][*]   no lyrics yet - submit it
25 There Won't Be Anymore [Demo Version] [#][*][Demo Version]  2:25 no lyrics yet - submit it

Reviews:

Also See The Golden Roots Review

It may be no secret by now that Charlie Rich was eclectic himself in his choice and style of music, so eclectic, so wide-ranging that he could not be categorized (a bit like Ray Charles). Due to that he never really achieved the success that he really deserved, years of countrypolitan or not, as nobody knew how to promote him. After "Behind Closed Doors" hit, the umpteen record companies that he had recorded for all seemed to release his songs from their vaults to capitalize on his new fame. I bought them all since I was not always able to when they first came out; they are all included in this package. Charlie had made new, equally as good or better. versions of his so-so hits (or non-hits) as he moved from record company to record company. Apparently he never did so with "A Little Bit Sweet", a favorite of this then-romantic teenager in the listening area of his home base of Memphis. "On My Knees", included here, was redone effectively with country singer Janie Fricke near the end of his countrypolitan reign. There was more than one version of "Sittin' and Thinkin'", a regional hit. The bluesy "There Won't Be Anymore" was restyled into a country hit in the mid-70s. The more ambitious version of "Midnight Blues" became an often-played album cut from "Every Time You Touch Me (I Get High"). The particular selection of the songs here seem very similar to the compilation "Original Hits and Midnight Demos" available in another venue. In any case, these are the originals from which the other versions sprang. This is a great piece of musical history. I value my own well-kept collection of these songs by a musician talented on all levels. I miss him.

The Golden Roots of the Silver Fox

Years before he found the sophisticated countrypolitan formula that would vault him to international fame in the mid-70s, Rich was a second-generation Sun rock 'n' roller. Starting in 1958, he released a string of truly fine singles that wed his background in R&B, blues and jazz to the reverbed energy of Sun's rockabilly sound. Surprisingly, he had virtually no commercial success in his six years at Sun, peaking at #22 with the self-penned "Lonely Weekends," hitting #67 on the country chart with "Who Will the Next Fool Be," and scraping the bottom of the pop chart at #111 with "Just a Little Bit Sweet."

Perhaps his delivery at such an early point in his career was just too similar to Elvis' contemporaneous work at RCA to capture its own audience. He sang with authority and not a little bit of swagger, but his Sun sides (actually released on the Sun subsidiary Phillips International) never ignited a commercial following. His success in placing songs with Sun labelmates suggests that perhaps Rich's style may have cut too smoothly across genres to engage those coming strictly from the worlds of rock 'n' roll, blues or R&B. It would be another 15 years before the record-buying world would wake up to his synthesis.

Rich's first single, "Whirlwind" b/w "Philadelphia Baby," shows a purer rockabilly sound to be a good fit for Rich's voice. By his second outing he was mixing in gospel ("Big Man"), and his third, "Lonely Weekends," adds blue country soul to the rock 'n' roll. He sang (and to a large extent, penned) doo-wop ("School Days"), Latin ballads ("On My Knees"), blues ("Who Will the Next Fool Be," "Midnight Blues"), R&B ("Easy Money," "Finally Found Out"), and pop jazz ("There's Another Place I Can't Go"). His versatility is admirable and effective, though it was probably confusing for the marketing folks at Sun.

Varese's compilation of Rich's original 10 singles (both A and B sides) is augmented by three album tracks and a pair of cuts previously unissued by Sun. Highlights among the bonuses are Rich's heartbroken, yet bouncy "Goodbye Mary Ann," the Jerry Lee Lewis styled piano rockabilly "Yes Ma'am," and the jazzy piano-driven blues growl "There Won't Be Anymore."

Fans familiar only with Rich's hit '70s sides, and perhaps "Lonely Weekend," as well as fans of '50s rock 'n' roll (or modern day revivalists like Big Sandy), will delight in this lesser explored side of The Silver Fox.